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BODYSCAN DATA

Bodyscan Limited must be acknowledged as the source if any of the tables, charts or other information from this page or elsewhere on this website is used externally.

The tables and charts on this page represent scan data from more than 10,000  DEXA body scans – over 6000 men and 4000 women, scanned at Bodyscan’s two London facilities between January 2015 and July 2019. The data does not, of course, represent a random sample of the UK population (there is a geographical bias and each client chose to have and pay for a scan). That said, it almost certainly represents the biggest UK sample of DEXA body composition data.

The percentile charts will be of most interest to existing Bodyscan clients who can compare the data in their own report with the larger client base.

How to read the percentile tables

The tables below show a range of percentiles (1st, 99th and each decile and quartile) for a range of DEXA data points. For example, in the body fat table for men of all ages  (excerpt below), the 25th percentile for Fat Mass Index (FMI) is 4.63. This means that 25% of all male clients have an FMI below this figure and 75% have an FMI above it. It means that a male with a fat mass index of around 4.6 is in the “top” 25% of all male Bodyscan clients.

Similarly, if you’re female and your Bodyscan DEXA report shows your Android (belly) fat percentage is 26%, you can see from the Android/Gynoid table excerpt below that this lies approximately half-way between 24.7% (the 30th percentile) and 27.6% (the 40th percentile). Therefore your android fat percentage is somewhere around the 35th percentile. In other words your belly fat percentage is lower than around 65% of female Bodyscan clients (and about 35% of female Bodyscan clients have a lower percentage than you). Your belly fat percentage is in the “top” (or “good”) 35 percent.

Some things to note:

1.  Unlike the ‘AM’ percentile figures on your Bodyscan DEXA report (which use US data), these tables are not age- or ethnicity matched; they are only matched for sex. However, as of November 2017, the data has been broken into three age ranges: 18-29, 30-49 and 50-plus. Our own  analysis of the data (see radar charts below from 2016) shows there is little variation in the numbers for most fat and lean indices between ages 18 and 50. The biggest variation by age is in visceral fat.

The average (mean) age for men in this data is 38; the median (50th percentile) is 37. The average age (mean) for women is also 38 and the median is 36.

2.  While there will be some correlation between some of the data fields, especially within each table (eg, a higher weight will correspond to a higher BMI; and higher android (belly) fat will usually correspond with higher visceral fat), correlation is not certain and the columns should be read independently of each other. Again, using the male body fat table as an example, if you are 75.6kg (ie, in the 25th percentile for weight), it does not mean that you “should” have a total body fat percentage of 18.5%. You may do better or worse (percentile-wise) on different measures.

3.  “Top” versus “bottom” and “good” versus “bad”.
Generally speaking, you will want your fat indices to be low and your lean numbers to be high (ie, a person typically wants to have lower body fat and more muscle mass than most other people). Therefore most people will strive to be below the 50th percentile for their fat numbers and above the 50th percentile for their lean data. That is, if you want to be in the “top” 10% (the 10th percentile) for your fat mass index (FMI), aiming to be in the “top” 10% for  your lean mass index (LMI) means that you will be aiming for the 90th percentile (not the 10th).

4.  Similarly, being at one extreme end of the percentile scale (in the 1st or 99th percentile) may not necessarily be a “good” thing.  It could mean, for example, that you have unhealthily low levels of fat. With ratios, such as the Trunk/Limb fat ratio, being in the 1st or 99th percentile simply means that your fat is either vastly more in your trunk or in your arms and legs – neither “good” or “bad”, just not typical. For ratios like these, a figure around the 50th percentile might be considered more “normal” or typical.

Abbreviations:
BMI = Body Mass Index (weight divided by height-squared)
FMI = Fat Mass Index (fat mass divided by height-squared)
LMI = Lean Mass Index (lean mass divided by height-squared)
ALMI = Appendage Lean Mass Index (lean mass in arms and legs divided by height-squared)
FMR = Fat Mass Ratio (percentage leg fat divided by percentage trunk fat)
Est VAT = Estimated Visceral Adipose Tissue (visceral fat)

Bodyscan Limited must be acknowledged as the source if any of the tables, charts or other information from this page or elsewhere on this website is used externally.

Male Weight & Fat Percentiles – download all male tables

Male Regional Fat Percentiles – click tables to enlarge

Variation of key indicators between age ranges in men

Bodyscan Limited must be acknowledged as the source if any of the tables, charts or other information from this page or elsewhere on this website is used externally.

Female Weight & Fat Percentiles – download all female tables

Female Regional Fat Percentiles – click tables to enlarge

Female Lean Mass & Bone Percentiles – click tables to enlarge

Variation of key indicators between age ranges in women

Bodyscan Limited must be acknowledged as the source if any of the tables, charts or other information from this page or elsewhere on this website is used externally.

Male & Female Radar Charts – NOTE: Data is from September 2016

The charts below look at the relationship between age and various data points. The median value is shown by a red line. Most interesting is that there is little if any correlation between age and data values. Where there is a visible trend, the broad spread of data (how far data points lie away from the median line) suggest strongly there is no predictability – ie, one does not cause the other.

Take a look at the notes under each chart.

Male Radar Charts – September 2016

The median male weight is 82.8kg and the data suggests there is no correlation between age and weight. That is, you shouldn’t be putting on weight (getting fatter) just because you’re getting older. However, there is a noticeable spike in the mid-thirties, when men appear to be at their heaviest. ©Bodyscan 2016
The median male body fat percentage is 22.8%. Whilst just about every male client over the age of 56 sits above the median line, this is just as likely to be due to declining lean body mass as it is to increasing fat. Remember, body fat percentage is affected not only by rising fat but by declining muscle mass too. See the FMI and LMI charts. ©Bodyscan 2016
The median male FMI is 5.78. There is a noticeable trend in the data from bottom left to top right, suggesting that men gain fat as they age. But the trend is slight and looks to be absent up until the mid-to-late fifties. After the age of 60, just about all men have a FMI above, even well above, the median value. ©Bodyscan 2016
The median male lean mass index is 19.3. As with the FMI chart above, there seems to be no correlation between age and lean mass until men reach their mid-fifties. After that point the majority of men show lean mass below the median. This makes sense because we lose muscle mass (and find it harder to gain) as we get older. The FMI and LMI charts together show men in their mid-fifties and beyond having higher fat mass and lower lean mass. ©Bodyscan 2016
The median male estimated visceral fat value is 67.5. The two blue lines represent the values of 100 (above which visceral fat is determined to put a person at “increased risk” of conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, colon cancer and stroke) and 160 (“high risk”). The data trends noticeably from bottom left to top right (ie, higher visceral fat with age) and there is only one data point below the median after age 57. Most worrying is the large volume of men as young as their late twenties with “increased risk” levels; and men at “high risk” from their early-to-mid-thirties. ©Bodyscan 2016

Bodyscan Limited must be acknowledged as the source if any of the tables, charts or other information from this page or elsewhere on this website is used externally.

Female Radar Charts – September 2016

The median female weight is 64.2kg and the data suggests there is no correlation between age and weight. That is, you shouldn’t be putting on weight (getting fatter) just because you’re getting older. There does appear to be a small spike, showing women at their heaviest in their twenties and early thirties. ©Bodyscan 2016
The median female body fat percentage is 32.1%. Visually, a ‘line of best fit’ might rise from bottom left to top right, the broad and even spread of data either side of the line suggests there is no correlation or predictability between age and body fat percentage. That is, you should not be getting fatter as you age. ©Bodyscan 2016
The median female FMI is 7.45. As with the body fat percentage chart above, the data forms two neat rectangles (of different sizes) above and below the median line. The spread suggests that there is no predictability to having a high or low FMI as you age (ie, you shouldn’t be getting fatter as you age). However, the wider range of values above the median than below it tells us that there is ‘fat’, ‘fatter’ and ‘very fat’. ©Bodyscan 2016
The median female lean mass index is 15.6. Compared to the male LMI chart there is little if any noticeable decline in LMI with age. A word of caution about high lean mass: it doesn’t mean the person is visibly muscular or built like a bodybuilder. High muscle mass is often found in people who are carrying very high levels of body fat (and therefore weight). ©Bodyscan 2016
The median female estimated visceral fat value is 39.0, just over half the value for men. The two blue lines represent the values of 100 (above which visceral fat is determined to put a person at “increased risk” of conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, colon cancer and stroke) and 160 (“high risk”). These thresholds do not, however, discriminate between men and women, so for a woman to be above either blue line is of concern. While there is a vague upward trend in older years this is caused by a few outliers with very high values and doesn’t appear until after age 50. The wide spread of data below the blue 100-line (the “increased risk” threshold) suggests there is little predictability between age and visceral fat levels. That is, you should not expect to increase fat around your organs as you get older. ©Bodyscan 2016

Bodyscan Limited must be acknowledged as the source if any of the tables, charts or other information from this page or elsewhere on this website is used externally.

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